COCA for translationists

(Corpus of Contemporary American English, alongside the other BYU corpora from Mark Davies)

For basically all my career, from my eikaiwa days Japanese university to community college to the IEP I teach at now, I’ve been trying to get my students to see vocabulary as more than lists of words with accompanying translations.

Image result for 英単語
Source

Sure, knowing one translation of “marry” is probably better than not knowing anything about “marry”, but it really just gets your foot in the door of knowing that word (and leaves you less able to enjoy semantically ambiguous sentences like “The judge married his son”). You still don’t have much of an idea of what kind of person uses that word, in what kind of situation, and (of special concern for fluency) what other words usually surround that word.

Part of what cramming for tests does to language learners (and really learners of anything) is convince them that the minimum amount of knowledge to be able to fill in the right bubble is efficient and expedient. One of the longest-running efforts of my career is trying to disabuse my students of the notion that when vocabulary is concerned, this kind of efficiency leads to anything worthwhile. To the contrary, the more seemingly extraneous information you have about any given word, the better you will remember it and the more fluently and accurately you will be able to use it.

(Naturally, the site where I first encountered this phenomenon was in Japan, where the question “What does that mean?” is almost incomprehensible except as a synonym for “Translate this into Japanese according to the translation list provided by your instructor”. But knowing a word and being able to use it (a dichotomy which collapses with any scrutiny) demands (again, a collapsed dichotomy being treated as a single subject) quite a lot more than an abstract token in a foreign language being linked to a more familiar token in one’s first language in memory. One can know that “regardless” “means” とにかく or 関係なくin Japanese without knowing what preposition usually follows it, which noun from “outcome”, “result”, or “upshot” most commonly follows that preposition, or that it has an even more academic ring than near-synonym “nonetheless” (which doesn’t have an accompanying preposition at all). Interestingly, overreliance on translation seems to be something of a vestigial trait of language education in Japan – people justify it for its utility on tests, but the tests themselves haven’t required translation in many years.)

Even when my students understand this, however, they still aren’t sure how to implement it. I get a lot of positive reactions to comparisons between chunks in English and in their first language (asking how many words a child hears in phrases like in “Idowanna”, やだ, 我不想 or je veux pas) or between words and animals (a lion can technically eat roast turkey, but what do lions usually eat?). Students readily identify chunks and idiomatic expressions that they hear outside of class (“Would you like to” and “got it” are some of the most-noticed). In the run-up to a vocabulary quiz though, where I want students to show all that they know about vocabulary, what I see most often on students’ desks is the familiar lists of translated pairs:

regardless 而不管 however 然而 nonetheless 尽管如此 nevertheless 但是 notwithstanding 虽然

It seems that students, when they “study”, tend to default to the strategies that they think got them through high school. Usually, students who have this tendency also have familiar patterns of scoring on quizzes: fine-to-high scores on the cloze (fill-in-the-blank) questions and low scores on anything outside of the narrow range where translation is applicable. I see this as a result of not being able to see how to use this knowledge of other features of vocabulary in their customary mode of studying.

I started using COCA in class as a way to plug the fuzzy, often-neglected dimensions of vocabulary learning – in particular register, genre, colligation and collocation – into a behavioral pattern that students have completely mastered. That is, COCA is a way to make a more complete picture of vocabulary compatible my students’ most familiar way of studying – sitting at a desk and looking up discrete words.

With that long preamble over, let’s have a look at the specific activities I use over the course of a term.

First glance at COCA

Starting on the first day, words of particular interest are added to a class web site – either my own, Vocabulary.com, or Quizlet (I’ve tried quite a few) – and drawn on for review, activities, and quizzes. Starting in week two, I introduce the idea of chunks (which they need in order to complete the reading circles sheets from that week on), either with a presentation or less formally, for example with a quiz game.

In a shorter term, I’ll introduce COCA the same week, or in a longer semester, around week 4 (my IEP has lightning-quick 6-week terms). The introduction usually has to be done in the lab – it’s much better if each student can do his or her own searches. I alternate between a worksheet and a presentation for the first introduction. This takes about an hour.

From experience, students never fail to see the utility of COCA at this stage and never seem to have trouble with the idea of another online resource. The issues that typically arise on the first day are:

  1. COCA locks out searches from IP addresses if there are too many in one day (as in a class of 20 or so all using COCA for the first time in a lab). This usually starts to afflict my classes after the first 20 minutes or so of searches.
  2. At minimum, students have to create accounts after the first few searches, which used to require a .edu email address, but doesn’t seem to now.
  3. The use of spaces on COCA is idiosyncratic. A search for ban_nn* (without a space) will find intances of “ban” used as a noun, while ban _nn* (with a space) will find “ban” plus any noun, for example “ban treaty”, or hilariously, “ban ki-moon”. ban* (without space) will find any word starting with “ban”, and ban * (with space) will find “ban” plus any word or punctuation mark. Punctuation needs to be separated with spaces as well. These rules trip up students fairly early on, as they search for, for example due to the fact that* and don’t find what they expect.

Weekly activities

After the first introduction, COCA will be in at least one homework or classwork assignment every week.

Classwork

From time to time, but especially before quizzes, students do a jigsaw-style group activity I call vocabulary circles. As you can see, a good half of it is COCA-derived. If you don’t know how these usually work, students with different jobs are assigned one word per group, share them with “experts” who had the same job from other groups, reconvene and share them with their own group, and then have to take turns presenting all their group’s work to their classmates.

Reading

COCA searches are a part of many of the reading circles sheets I use (reading circles are the only way I do any intensive reading in class). Vocabulary specialists (or whatever you call them) are always responsible for chunks as a category of vocabulary as well as collocations for other words.

Discussions

Starting the week that COCA is introduced, weekly “Vocabulary Logs” on Canvas include COCA work like that reproduced below:

This week, you must use COCA to find something interesting about a word from our class vocabulary list. You must find these 3 things:

What other words usually come before and after that word?
Who usually uses that word? (For example, lawyers, academic writers, news anchors, etc.)
Which forms of the word are the most common? (For example, “present simple”, “plural”, “adverb”, etc.)

You get 6 points for answering all of these questions.
Then, in a reply, use a classmate’s word in a new example sentence that you make. This section will be graded on correctness, so read your classmate’s post carefully. (2 pts)

Or this option to take translationism head-on:

This week, you will compare a word from another language (for example, your first language) to a word in English. The words should be translations of each other.
You will point out how the two words are similar or different in these areas:

Collocation: Do the same or similar kinds of words come before or after the words?
Grammar: Are the words the same part of speech? Are the rules for the parts of speech different in the two languages?
Register: Do the words appear in the same kinds of situations? Are they similar in formality?
Meaning: Do the words have second or third meanings that are different?

This post is worth 6 points. Reply to a classmate for 1 more point.

Quizzes

The quizzes in my classes after COCA has been introduced all have some explicitly COCA-derived questions and some questions that are graded on COCA-relevant considerations.

In questions like the one below, “grammar” includes part of speech and colligation.

Use the word in a sentence that makes the meaning clear. (1 pt for grammar and 1 pt for clear meaning)
(sustainable) _____________________________________________________________

Some questions target collocations specifically (ones that have been discussed specifically in class):

Circle the most common collocation. (1 pt each)
A difficult environment can precipitate ( fights / conflict / argument ).
Adaptation ( onto / to / with )  a new culture takes time.

Other questions target the colligations of vocabulary that should be familiar for other reasons:

Fill in the blank with one of the following. (1 pt each)
Regardless of Owing to Because Also
_______________________ the waiter made a mistake with our order, our meal was free. _______________________, the chef sent us a free dessert. Lucky us!

Students cannot have COCA open during the quiz, but they can (and are advised to) get to know the words inside and out beforehand. As you may have seen, our vocabulary lists can grow fairly long by the end of the term, but words often appear on more than one quiz.

Essays

See my last post on the subject.

I am getting on board the “reflection as revision” train – grading reflection on grammar instead of grammatical accuracy on all drafts besides the first. COCA is the vehicle I use for this.

Conclusions

I presented this to you as a way to get students with an unhealthy focus on one-to-one translation to think about vocabulary in a way that better facilitates real-world use. Actually, it works even better with students predisposed to think of vocabulary in more holistic terms – but those students would often be fairly good learners just with enough input. The advantage of using COCA is that it can easily piggyback on habits that certain students may overuse – many of my students have browser extensions on their computers that translate any word the mouse hovers over. Adding one more dictionary-like tool that includes what dictionaries miss is a way to swim with that tendency rather than against it.

JALT vs. CATESOL pt. 2

A few weekends ago I attended my second major CATESOL event, and I noticed a few more differences from my last teaching organization, JALT (the Japan Association For Language Teaching – yes, they capitalize “For”, meaning the acronym really should be JAFLT, or ジャフルト).  I’ve come to notice what I think is a bit of a drawback to CATESOL’s highly dedicated and professional members.  I’ll dance around it for a little before I finally get to it later on.  Or maybe I’ll nestle it between body paragraphs so you’re not tempted to just skip to the bottom.

One thing you find when moving from one culture to another is that you frequently find yourself waiting for things that never happen, seeing social cues that are invisible to the rest of the population and waiting for a conditioned response that is curiously not forthcoming – a “bless you” after a sneeze, a door held open, or a formulaic conversation-ending phrase before your coworker leaves the break room.  In CATESOL and in my first semester in ESL in California I’ve had this feeling very often.  I keep expecting some hot-button topic to be mentioned, even gratuitously, and then it’s not.  Or I expect the speaker to drop an author’s name just to let the audience know he/she knows his/her stuff, but he/she just moves on.  In their place, sometimes things I’m not familiar with get name-dropped instead, or sometimes (this is most alienating) nothing happens at all.  I find myself oddly unable to follow professional conversations in a natural way.  Many conversations here seem like the first time I heard a telephone conversation in Japan, where nobody says “bye”, they just hang up when they’re done talking.

I’ve written down a few things I found myself waiting for and didn’t see – things that are conspicuously absent from my CATESOL/ESL experience.  For reflection, I’ll follow them with some things that I hear regularly in CATESOL or ESL but I rarely or never heard in Japan or JALT.  And for the record, I still haven’t lived in California for even half a year, so feel free to take my claims with as much salt as you need.

MIA in CATESOL

Native Speaker.  I have heard this just once here, from another teacher from Japan.  On the other hand, at least 2 of my superiors have been non-native speakers, and many more coworkers wouldn’t have fit the NST mold in Japan (i.e., they are not white).  I have heard a bit about the advantages of learning from teachers who have experience learning English as adults, in that they understand where the students are coming from or are former ESL students themselves.  Interestingly, this was not couched in a NST/NNST dichotomy, but rather the firsthand ESL experience of those teachers.  I kept expecting the words “native” and “non-native” to be used, as they often were in Japan, to discuss the stereotyped strengths of the NST/NNST groups (in Japan, “foreign” and “Japanese”).  Even more surprisingly, but I haven’t heard any talk of the supposed advantages of NSTs, whether for authenticity, correctness, or anything else.  It’s almost as if people here believe that NS status isn’t as salient as qualifications or experience as a language teacher!

Interlanguage.  This troubles me.  The way I understand our profession, interlanguage is the ball we are always trying to move down the field, and everything else we do is just indirectly trying to do that.  If I don’t hear any acknowledgment of interlanguage in discussions of what we do, I fear I may not understand the rules of the game we’re playing.  By “acknowledgment of interlanguage” I mean recognizing that some aspects of students’ mental representations of English may have to come in a certain order (not the order that grammar textbooks present them in), that the representations we care most about aren’t always amenable to explicit teaching (i.e., “knowing” a rule won’t necessarily lead to its incorporation in IL), and that grammar terms are not necessarily the currency of the classroom, useful as they might be for other reasons. Way too often in CATESOL I hear people talk about “grammar teaching” as if its only possible form were “explaining grammar in metalanguage”, and “grammar syllabus” (or worse, “coursebook”) as a stand-in for “syllabus”.  I see some indirect evidence that people think about IL, and in many cases it could just be that they think they’re too mundane to talk about.  On the other hand, I’ve heard people dropping grammar terms as if they were celebrities they once met, and it seems taken for granted that lower-level courses are “grammar-based”.  My brain threatens to abandon ship whenever someone describes lower-level ESL as “teaching basic grammar forms”.

I haven’t figured out what this lack of mentioning is evidence of, but a bit of open discussion on old staples input, intake, uptake, interaction, and natural order would go a long way toward putting my fears to rest.  I feel a bit like I’ve been admitted to a prestigious medical school, but all I’ve heard discussed are 1) holistic ways to lengthen life and 2) the head bone’s connected to the (beat) neck bone.

Extensive Reading.  I suppose this follows from the last one.  A few colleagues at my current institution have talked about this, and I’ve heard rumors that it was once attempted.  My school does in fact have almost a full bookshelf of graded readers (more if you include other languages), organized by one of the full-timers, so it may be ahead of the curve.  I haven’t heard ER mentioned in presentations though, especially to the gratuitous degree it’s mentioned in JALT, even in presentations on totally different topics.  To the contrary, I have seen a great many reading textbooks here, most intended for close reading as a class, with the more unfamiliar vocabulary the better.  My fear is that the lack of concern for interlanguage is what drives the lack of focus on ER, or that people are making assumptions about their students’ exposure to English outside the classroom (potentially obviating the need for a focus on input in the classroom) that aren’t coming true.  See next point.

Free conversation.  This is generally a term of abuse in SLA, and many people would take it as a sign of quality that ESL teachers seem to avoid it.  However, and this surprised me as much as anything about ESL, most teachers here also seem to understand that their students remain ensconsed in their L1 communities when not in the classroom.  This being the case, and considering how infrequent cases of successful L2 acquisition that include no unscripted interaction are, we really ought to look for ways to actively encourage free conversation, even at the expense of stuff that is actually in the curriculum.  I recognize that not everyone is willing to jump on the Dogme train (another term I haven’t heard in SoCal – Dogme, not train.  Actually, train too) but if our students have little to no interaction, negotiation, opportunity for recast, etc. on subjects of their choosing, and instead have 5 hours of controlled grammar practice per week, we’re sacrificing probably the most important predictor of L2 learning for something 4th or 5th on the list.  It seems very odd to me that teachers can see how close many of their students’ day-to-day lives are to EFL rather than ESL and continue to focus on form as if input and interaction were taken care of.

To recap, my main concern is that the lack of IL discussion that I’ve seen evinces a lack of knowledge about what really builds L2 competence, and that grammar books and dense reading activities have filled the gap that that knowledge should occupy.  Again, some people seem to talk in a way that implies IL is a central concern and simply haven’t used the word, which is fine – they don’t feel a need to name-drop it.  The thing is, I’m not convinced everyone is on the same page where this is concerned, as evidenced by the abundance of synthetic syllabi and grammar jargon.  Many folks seem to think that their job is explaining English grammar, and that this will result in students being able to use it.  I hope to be proven wrong.

On the other hand…

行方不明 (whereabouts unknown) in JALT

Credit/non-credit.  By this term I mean the distinction between classes which lead to transfer and those that don’t.  I’m willing to chalk some of my opinions on this topic in Japan to the fact that I spent almost all my career there teaching at my own school and later to non-English-majors at university.  However, I’m convinced that almost all ELT in Japan is low-stakes, and no discussions on credit/non-credit classes are a symptom of this.  Let me qualify that – almost all ELT that conforms at all to international norms is low-stakes, because ELT that is not test-prep is almost by definition irrelevant.  If you are doing anything other than helping students cram in pretertiary settings, you are giving your students more “cultivation” and “character” than real opportunity to advance in society.  The apparent lack of communicative English in the public school systems is a bit more complicated than I’m making it seem here (briefly, the high-stakes tests most parents think they’re preparing their kids for by teaching them grammar-translation don’t actually have much or any grammar-translation on them), but the point is that 20th-21st century approaches to SLA like CLT are on the losing half of a “serious/unserious” dichotomy, grammar-translation being cartoons from the New Yorker and CLT being Larry the Cable Guy.  If you want to be treated as a professional, teach like it’s 1890.

JALT, an organization aligned much more with international ELT than Japanese public education, has a membership who sees grammar-translation as stone-age pedagogy (which sometimes makes it appear to old-fashioned grammar teachers as a professional organization of unprofessionals).  Its ranks are full of highly intelligent and passionate teachers working in stigmatized “oral communication” classes, desperate for their work to be taken seriously.  As with a lot of ELT in Japan, the closeness to international norms of any teacher’s approach seems inversely proportional to the seriousness with which society takes them.  If you are a JALT member, your greatest achievements with your students are almost invisible to the machinery of social advancement.

In contrast, “credit” teaching in community colleges in the US is playing for keeps – you’re teaching students who more often than not plan to transfer to American universities, and the skills they get with you help them in immediate ways.  What they get with your help will lead them to get along better with their classmates, make sense of a lecture, or understand what exactly about the latest Trump quote everyone is so alarmed/amused about within the very near future, not on some hypothetical far-off study abroad or business trip.  Even “non-credit” students still have to live here, and in my experience are motivated in a way that seems less conducive to narrow-minded grammar study.  If you teach in Japan you’ll have a few students who need English to achieve their heartfelt goals, and make inspiring use of their language skills – but my point is that if you teach ESL, they’ll be the majority in every class.

I don’t mean to say that ELT in Japan would be improved by the addition of more credit classes – but the prevalence of discussions of “credit/non-credit” classes in ESL (along with various other terms you hear bandied about, like “SLOs” and “transfer”) shows how much edifice is built around the idea that people in the US really need English education.

Immigrants get it done

As I said in an earlier post, a whiff of desperation and a nagging feeling of inadequacy can sometimes be a great motivator.  Maybe teachers in Japan are overcompensating with their high-minded discussions of when output leads to noticing the gap, but their students are almost definitely better off for it – even if the circumstances that produced such passion for the details of SLA are unhealthy overall.  Also, maybe being somewhat isolated socially, particularly from the norms of ELT in Japan (which, again, date back to the advent of village horticulture in the Yayoi period) allows JALT members not to be co-opted as much by an industry that would much prefer you just use a coursebook than plan tasks or have conversations.

I realize now one of the most essential aspects of JALT – it is composed of immigrants and deviants.  The NSTs in JALT are mostly members of racial and cultural minorities, and the Japanese JALT folks are people who like to hang out with visible minorities.  They would not blend in in a crowd of average citizens and gain little social capital from their careers.  Of course they lack the youthful energy of CATESOL; very few of them went straight from their BA to grad school and then right into teaching.  I suspect most of them (like me) had years of teaching experience before they got their first qualification.  They also have an immigrant’s healthy skepticism of mainstream culture; a decades-old tradition of teaching one particular way has no meaning to an immigrant NST.  They have little use (or little chance of establishing) institution identities around their places of work; they need professional identities established among other people with shared experience and expertise to take pride in their work.

Maybe I’m romanticizing the immigrant experience in Japan a bit.  Still, I think “institutionalization” is my new favorite word for capturing the differences I’ve felt between CATESOL and JALT.

Appendix: Phrases that causes my jejunum to undulate violently

“when you get to that point in the curriculum”

“the present simple” (particularly in Chapter One of a grammar textbook)

“transfer errors”

“master a grammar point and continue on to the next one”

“workbook”

“extra-credit reading”

“reduced adjective clause”

“_________ clause” (when spoken to a beginning learner)

“too high-level”

“know the meaning exactly” (meaning “know the accepted translation in Japanese”)

“University of Lye-chester”

jejunumlabelled
Highly sensitive to neglect of interlanguage.

 

JALT vs. CATESOL

I’m still digesting my first CATESOL conference, along with the fairly huge lunch that came with it, put on by my local Orange County Chapter, and I thought I’d post some reflections on the differences between JALT (Japan Association for Language Teaching) events and CATESOL, based on the years I spent in officer positions at the former and the whole one event I’ve been to from the latter.

Accents and internationalization

I.e., varieties of non-native accents.  JALT, despite its name, is mostly the NEST organization in Japan; Japanese English teachers and teachers of other languages participate more in other organizations like JACET or no organization at all.  As a result, you hear mostly BANA (Britain, Australia, North America) accents and occasionally Japanese accents.  I widened my circle of native English-speaking acquaintances quite a bit in JALT – and for some reason a hugely disproportionate number of those were from the smallish town of Nanaimo, British Columbia – and I made some Japanese acquaintances too, but not nearly as many at nearby dog parks.

The CATESOL event featured quite a variety of accents and national backgrounds.  I’m pretty sure I heard Korean being spoken in the background at at least a few points, I was approached by a Japanese student doing a semester abroad, the host is apparently from Russia, one of my partners for breakout discussions was from Spain, and several other people revealed having been born in another country during the normal course of conversation but had no (non-Californian) accent that I could discern.  This was quite a refreshing change from the internationalism that somehow results in homogeneity that I witnessed often among English teachers in Japan.

Internationalism is a bit a of a banal subject here, it seems.  No one talks about it; no one encourages it or dismisses it.  No English teacher here thinks it is his/her mission to internationalize Southern California.  Best of all, there is no Holliday-sian Catch-22 where the white BANA teachers are the only ones talking about NNEST equality and opposing linguistic imperialism while their local managers and deans openly use them and their semiotically valuable “Western” features as advertising to recruit students who still think white faces = authentic English.  Also none of the clearly hypocritical regressive liberalism when NESTs’ instincts to valide Japanese teachers’ identities result in agreeing to their claims of non-overlapping magisteria, Japanese teachers’ purview being supposedly impossible-for NEST skills like speaking Japanese and understanding juken.  I attended a presentation at the CATESOL event that addressed these issues, but the context was different – it wasn’t so clearly divorced from the consciousness of the community, including most language teachers, outside the room.

To be fair, this isn’t a negative point of JALT so much as it is of the surrounding population of teachers and learners.  It is an issue though that I am happy to put behind me.

Youth, cheerfulness of

I was easily one of the older attendees at the CATESOL conference.  There were poster presentations, most of which seemed to be put on by recent college graduates (although one turned out to be an old Japan hand like me who just looks young).  Many tables at lunchtime put me in mind of the archetypal high school cafeteria (as portrayed in film – my high school didn’t have a cafeteria), by the sheer conversational energy and assuredness of youth.  The Plenary speaker was older, but such things are expected.  All the presenters seemed to be my age at the very maximum.  This gave me a short frisson as well as I realized these people were also several years into a local career that I was now starting afresh.

JALT’s composition, mostly college teachers with MAs or better, pushes the age scale quite a bit upwards.  I’m pretty sure at least some of the other Chapter Presidents or SIG Coordinators were in their 60s, and mid-30s (as I was) seemed to mark one as thoroughly green.  If CATESOL is the NAMM show, JALT is the local symphony’s booster club.  One or two JALT folks were younger than me, perhaps young enough to have to show ID when buying beer (that’s a joke – no one shows ID when buying beer in Japan), but even they were well past the time in their lives when they could be sure what they were saying and their dreams were gleefully unrealized.

Motivation, to participate and to discuss

I mean this in two ways; motivation for being there and motivation as a point of discussion. Both provide some interesting contrasts between the two organizations.

I was surprised to find two people at my table in attendance simply to fulfill a workplace “flex time” requirement, which I suppose is the closest equivalent to having 研究費 kenkyuuhi “research funds”to spend and looking for the least boring way to do so.  Many of the local community colleges also apparently sponsor their teachers’ CATESOL memberships and participation in events like these; I know of at least one forward-thinking eikaiwa that does the same for JALT.

I mentioned before that the energy level among the attendees was high.  I attribute this (perhaps prematurely) to security in the meaning of their jobs; they know that professional development is rewarded by their institutions and appreciated by their students.  One lady in particular left a huge impression on me as someone whose work definitely mattered: she taught ESL in prisons.  That fact and concept alone, revealed to me before the plenary started, basically floored me for most of the speech, as I kept thinking about how small my world of TOEFL test prep and Ideal L2 Selves had been instead of listening to what I’m sure was an interesting and practical treatise on critical thinking. I asked her questions about it throughout our lunch, barely letting her finish her sandwich.  I still feel a bit like my perspective on SLA has been broadened suddenly by a factor of 100, possibly leaving stretch marks.  The point is, people in CATESOL know that their teaching matters.

I’m not totally sure that this is a drawback for JALT, though.  To be honest, the type of teacher who works for decades in Japan and doesn’t burn out is usually very good at deciding what to spend mental resources on, who to try to connect with, and how to best motivate different groups of learners.  English teachers in Japan may also describe their jobs as TENOR (this was whispered to me by the teacher and later presenter sitting next to me during the plenary, which actually made me laugh out loud – it stands for Teaching English for No Obvious Reason), but that means that because you’re not constantly being fed job satisfaction, you have to work to look for it or make it yourself.  JALT presentations sometimes have a faint whiff of desperate appeals for someone in society to take their job seriously, but this does make JALT members work very hard on professional-level presentations and serious research.  It’s overcompensating for the way most of society still sees English teachers, and NESTs in particular, but overcompensating has probably motivated a lot of great work in every field in which people have felt chronically inadequate.  It certainly didn’t hurt Napoleon or David Letterman.

Motivation as a topic was much less present in CATESOL than JALT, or so it seemed to me.  Again, motivation in JALT is a bit like water in Mad Max, it inspires cult-like worship when someone like Andy Boon seems to be able to turn it on and off like a faucet in his classes.  The rest of us realize how precious it is when chronically, post-apocalyptically deprived of it in ours, and the predominant issues in lesson planning become not how to facilitate development of students’ abilities but how to get them to care enough to answer a single yes or no question (besides Shunya; he’s always game).  At CATESOL motivation was more like water in Japan; the issue was not how to make more of it but how to channel it and dam it efficiently so as not to let it overflow its banks (unpacking the metaphor, discussions were not on motivation itself but what to do in classes that were presumed to have plenty of it).  There was one poster presentation on extrinsic motivation, and the study that formed its content was from the Philippines.  If you want to pack an auditorium at a JALT conference, just name your presentation some motivational variant on “Getting your students to speak”.  They may have to bump you up to the 大ホール.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing either for JALT, though.  The plebeians worshipping Immortan Joe in Mad Max aren’t wrong that water is extremely important, and you can bet that if they ever move to Japan they will appreciate the hell out of that Mt. Fuji runoff.

Lunch

Lunch was huge.  Did I mention that?

Strain Theory, Eigo and Eikaiwa

Criminology, being more or less a specialized subset of sociology focused on how societies treat deviance, offers many lessons applicable to education.  Classrooms and student bodies are types of little societies after all, and it stands to reason that they would have their own versions of deviance, criminality, and sanctions; these being necessary parts of any society.

Merton’s Strain theory was one of the most memorable theories from my undergrad years (nominally spent studying social ecology, an interdisciplinary major of which criminology was a component).  Strain theory, as I remember it without referring back to Wikipedia, attempts to categorize deviant (non-mainstream) behavior in terms of acceptance or rejection of mainstream goals and means.

In general terms, under strain theory one can accept or reject mainstream goals (e.g., getting into college) and mainstream means (e.g., studying hard) independently of each other – you can dismiss college as the goal of education while being a fierce autodidact, or hold college admission as a goal while gaming the system by cheating on your SATs, or (for some reason) cheat on your SATs while not intending to go to college.  Which behaviors fall under the different categories below, of course, depend on the means and goals particular to that culture and/or society.

The canonical example of strain theory has financial success as the goal and employment as the means.  One could accept the goal of getting rich while robbing banks to get there, and this would be Innovation.  One could also give up on getting rich while still clocking in every day, which would be Ritualism.  Or one could spend all one’s time feeding the ducks at the park, in Retreatism.

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OK, I had to check Wikipedia to make sure I had these labels right.

I’ve made two new versions of the above graph describing cultures of English learning in Japan, in which the goals and means for learning English differ.  The cultures corresponding to these graphs are captured under the terms eigo and eikaiwa.  If you are unfamiliar with these terms, chances are you have never taught in Japan.  The two are dichotomized quite strongly, and as we shall see, mainstream values in one are often stigmatized in the other.  Briefly, eigo is closely aligned with mandatory education and eikaiwa with English as a means of international (mostly verbal) communication.  For more detailed treatments of these different cultures of English in Japan, check out my MA thesis and its list of references.

Also see Diane Hawley Nagatomo’s new book Identity, Gender and Teaching English in Japan for a comprehensive and practical review of how these two ideologies of English affect individual teachers in Japan.

Continue reading “Strain Theory, Eigo and Eikaiwa”

Eikaiwa, terrorists, and George W. Bush (and more Engrish)

I remember before the 2003 Iraq war started, George W. Bush appeared on the news telling Saddam Hussein to “disarm”.  He also spoke directly to the Iraqi public in formal speeches like this one.

I’m not sure how true the part about Iraqis being able to listen to him is, but it is certainly telling how everything he chooses to say to the Iraqis is something the Americans public would have wanted to hear, and that his comments to Iraqis were bookended by parts specifically toward Americans. As for the “disarm” comment which I don’t have video for, I don’t know if an Iraqi news agency reporter was present or whether or not Saddam had CNN.  I guess he would have, but of course if the message was really intended for him W. didn’t need to give it in front of the American public.  Presumably heads of state have means to reach each other without simultaneously reaching hundreds of millions of normal folks.

In guiding his ostensible message to Saddam toward the ears of the American public, W. was putting himself in company of both terrorists and children’s English teachers.  That sounds provocative but also confusing.  I have good, parsimonious and mostly apolitical reasons for saying this which I’ll explain below.

Continue reading “Eikaiwa, terrorists, and George W. Bush (and more Engrish)”

Eikaiwa websites: Advertising ideology

The eikaiwa industry is to native-speakerism (NSism) what the Trump campaign is to racism. It is the largest legitimate beachhead the ideology has made in mainstream culture, and the clearest venue to see the its power in convincing people to hand over money and other resources.  Unfortunately, as I keep going on about, eikaiwa (for those not in the know, omnipresent commercial English schools in Japan usually featuring NSs) are barely touched on in academic research (exceptions: Appleby, Bailey, Kelsky, Kubota, Nagatomo). Part of this is because it can be hard to gain access to eikaiwa for research, and part of it is because the types who conduct SLA research tend to work in universities, where populations of undergraduates are already easily available.  The drunk searching for his keys under the streetlight and all that.

Just as an introduction to the ideologies of education one can see in the eikaiwa world, I’ve biopsied a small slice of eikaiwa websites from one city in Japan and its surrounding area.  Below I will name them and review the issues I uncover.

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GABA, nationwide chain, advertises itself like a dating service.

Continue reading “Eikaiwa websites: Advertising ideology”

Things (the game)

Here’s a class activity that like my last two is basically a frame for communicative use of selected grammar and vocabulary.  This one is based on a party game that I was introduced to on a trip back to the US called Things.  It has the advantage, in addition to its flexibility, of requiring very little in terms of materials or preparation.  For groups of 3-6, ages 9 and up.

The rules of the game are simple:

  1. Everyone writes a sentence or idea on a predetermined theme (e.g. “Things you put on a sandwich”) on their own small slip of paper.
  2. A player designated the reader collects the slips (in smaller classes, the teacher is usually the reader).
  3. The reader reads all of them anonymously, including his/her own.
  4. Players except the reader take turns guessing who wrote what.  Obviously, they can’t guess their own.  If they are right (other players have to be honest about whether theirs has bee guessed), that answer is eliminated and the player who wrote it is eliminated too.  The reader can read the remaining answers aloud again as requested.
  5. After all the answers are guessed or after a set number of go-rounds, the player who guesses the most correctly is the winner.

Read on for detailed steps, benefits for language learners, and 工夫 (customizations).

Continue reading “Things (the game)”